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Quote of the Day

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Agnes
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Quote of the Day

Postby Agnes » Sun Oct 27, 2013 11:03 am

"It’s true that Edgar Allan Poe considered the death of a beautiful woman to be “the most poetical topic in the world” but really, it’s not the subject that makes for poetry, it’s the work on language that the subject enables the poet to do." ~~Barry Schwabsky

http://hyperallergic.com/88076/why-im-n ... ise-gluck/

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Re: Quote of the Day

Postby Cat Sith » Sun Oct 27, 2013 1:41 pm

So, have you read her? What do you think of her poetry. I read (most of) the article, but I've never read her poetry.

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Re: Quote of the Day

Postby Agnes » Sun Oct 27, 2013 3:30 pm

WordSith wrote:So, have you read her? What do you think of her poetry. I read (most of) the article, but I've never read her poetry.


http://www.poets.org/poet.php/prmPID/82 I read these ones. Can't say I like any of 'em. No music in them. No magic. No color. No twists and turns. Barely a death rattle. Those poems don't make me care that they exist. Just blah writing to me. Maybe over the years I've read something of hers that I like, but if I did, I've forgotten it. Read some of those poems at that link and tell me what you think. What kind of "work on language" do you see?

Look at this one: http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/179772 It's not a great poem, but I think I like it better than those others. I don't care for the form or line breaks in this. Its one saving grace is the sibling twist added to the biblical story. Her take on that didn't quite work for me at first when she says "what could you do/to save her but be/willing to destroy/yourself", but it does make me stop to think a bit. That's more than I can say for the other poems in the first link.

http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?se ... ersion=KJV (The bible story, in case you haven't read it. ;) )


Anyway, I posted the quote just to explore the idea of "the work on language," not necessarily Louise Gluck's poetry.

"it’s not the subject that makes for poetry, it’s the work on language that the subject enables the poet to do."

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Re: Quote of the Day

Postby Agnes » Mon Oct 28, 2013 11:37 am

I spend most of my time these days not writing, wandering the web, wondering, observing. Perhaps you've noticed. Perhaps not. Anyway, this morning I came across more grist for the mill concerning poetry and poets' "work on language." The blog owner has shared numerous poems which to my mind display "work on language" that makes for good poetry. Interesting poetry. Real poetry. Poetry that's not blah. Maybe you'll agree. Maybe you won't. Here's a link to one specific poem shared at this blog. The poem is "The Necessity for Irony" by Eavan Boland. http://holyordinary.blogspot.com/2013/1 ... -poem.html Read some of the other poems shared at this blog, if you have the time, and if any of them speak to you, ask yourself why. If your response to them is "blah" you can still ask yourself why. :smt002

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Re: Quote of the Day

Postby Cat Sith » Thu Oct 31, 2013 1:06 pm

I need to go back and reread the frist one --I think I missed the concept completely. What does it mean, exaclty, "work on language'. If I recall from the article at all, it would be that the poetry is in how the words are manipulated, rather than the message or topic of the poem. Close?

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Re: Quote of the Day

Postby Agnes » Thu Oct 31, 2013 1:49 pm

WordSith wrote:I need to go back and reread the frist one --I think I missed the concept completely. What does it mean, exaclty, "work on language'. If I recall from the article at all, it would be that the poetry is in how the words are manipulated, rather than the message or topic of the poem. Close?



Yes.

From the original article:
"White’s review struck me as typical of the way poetry is discussed in the mainstream press, not unusual, and I just want to tell reviewers of poetry that there’s at least one reader out there who’s mostly less interested in what someone’s poems are about than in what kind of linguistic experiences the poems make out of what they are about."

In poetry, which is more important, the means (language) or the end (subject/theme or message)? Without means (manipulation of language), the end is irrelevant because readers might never (want to) get there (unless we put a gun to their heads--perhaps that's common practice in academic circles :smt003 ).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZpKcqraRdfs
http://www.design.caltech.edu/erik/Misc/Jabberwock.html

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Re: Quote of the Day

Postby Cat Sith » Mon Nov 25, 2013 1:47 pm

I absolutely love that article about Jabberwocky! Thank you for posting it.

I think that it's true for me, the wordplay is more important than the actual content of the poem. If I love the content, it's a bonus. I read through several of the poems and links you posted. The one about the girl with the red hair at the junk sales really struck me.


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